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Are you interested in Yershov book in English?
Yes, I would like to buy and read the book
60%
 60%  [ 32 ]
Yes, but I would only read if it is freeware
37%
 37%  [ 20 ]
No, I am not interested.
1%
 1%  [ 1 ]
Всего проголосовало : 53


Translation of Yershov book
СообщениеДобавлено: Ср Окт 04, 2006 12:29 Ответить с цитатой
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A very interesting and useful book for pilots and simmers alike was written by an outstanding Tu-154 Captain and aviation writer Vassily Yershov, a 20+ year veteran pilot. I am currently translating it into English to allow non-Russian speakers to enjoy this beautiful literary work. In the book you will find a wealth of knowlege, wisdom and experience. This book will no doubt enrich your flying, simulated or otherwise, beyond limits. This, of course, is my opinion. I might be mistaken, so I am asking your opinion. Would you be interested in such a book, and if so, would you pay to buy it, since there is a lot of hard work being put into this project. You can see a sample of Chapter 1 "The Captain" below. Please note that this text is only preliminary, the translation is an ongoing work and everything will be revised and edited a lot before it takes its final form.

"...Every captain has this cold tingling feeling in his stomach: what he will do if, God forbid, something goes wrong. We are all human. We all want to live and we are all afraid sometimes.
Going to work, each of us has asked himself over and again, “What will I do in an emergency?”
The primitive “ah… whatever” doesn’t work here, although is perfectly suited for a kid dashing around in his dad’s new sports car. I have been in situations, when I felt utterly helpless in the face of Nature, when I was totally and completely paralyzed by terror. This is a natural reaction, which stuns you for several seconds, which are sometimes the most important. But you have to get a grip on yourself. Your sense and the ability to think and to act come back reluctantly, and it does take some will power to set your mind to the task at hand.
The basis for the actions, governed by the reluctant mind, is your professionalism. Everything, or at least, almost everything which can happen to you in flight, can and should be foreseen. Every case is recreated and replayed; you prepare yourself for every eventuality, including situations that happened to others before you.
As a rule, complex problems are solved by captains with analytic abilities. This is in itself a subject for discussion.
I had been flying for eighteen years already and was the captain of a Tu-154, when an accident happened. An airplane, piloted by a crew from our squadron, crashed soon after takeoff.
Captain Viktor Falkov was an extraordinary pilot. He flew a piston Il-14 to the North Pole, he was always entrusted with the most complex tasks, and when we received the Tupolev aircraft, he, with a group of talented captains, was trained directly for the new type as an exception.
He, who was the most experienced among us, perished. We were in shock. Tu-154, our most reliable aircraft, piloted by our most experienced captain, crashed.
The flight recorders indicated that after takeoff engine number 3 went to pieces. Fragments of the engine severed the control line of engine number 2. A fire ensued. Sixteen warning lights flashed in the face of the flight engineer, due to a short-circuit in a bundle of wires. He started to extinguish engine 3 fire. Manipulating the controls, he saw that engine two RPM was decreasing, and decided that he had mistakenly shut it off instead of the burning engine 3, while in fact engine two RPM dropped because of absence of control. It was all but impossible to sort out the chaos of dancing needles and flashing lamps. The engineer did all he could, but he failed to identify the problem properly with all the contradictory indications, and the burning engine’s fire shutoff valve remained open. Later, as we replayed the situation in a simulator, neither test-pilots, nor cosmonauts could bring the situation back under control. Suffering his apparent mistake, the flight engineer strived frantically to re-start the working engine two.
In these circumstances, the captain was overwhelmed by a stream of contradictory data and focused on finding out of what really happened: which engine was burning and which was mistakenly shut down. He tried to sort it out with the flight engineer, trying to reassure the young specialist, “Which one’s burning? Which one’s shut down? Have you opened this? Have you closed that?”
Meanwhile, the unattended engine two developed takeoff power and the flight engineer reported having “restarted number two, but it’s out of control”. At this time it was essential to perform emergency descent and the question was whether to shut number two down and land on a single engine.
Time passed irrevocable. The captain ordered the first officer with the navigator to set up for landing in the departure airport, while trying desperately to sort out what was actually going on aboard the plane and if the fire was being extinguished.
More than four minutes have passed since the fire had started and the first officer with the navigator were descending and turning to the landing course. The runway was within two minutes of flight, and the fire engulfed the aft part of the fuselage, which contains the hydraulic fluid tanks, which feeds the aircraft control systems.
And then, hydraulic systems failed, all three of them. The uncontrolled plane went down with a bank, struck the ground and exploded.
After the funeral I constantly though about what I would have done in Falkov’s place. I have studied our thick books, made notes, and imagined the havoc in the cockpit during their last moments on long sleepless nights. What would I have done? What is the first thing to do in such situation? Is there a way out of it?
Viktor Falkov, with about 20,000 flight hours under his belt, was unprepared for this emergency. My conclusion was that the only salvation was to return to the runway immediately! Return as soon as possible, because hydraulics fail in four minutes. This is my time limit. I must be able to return to the runway from anywhere in the pattern within four minutes. After landing the plane can burn all she wants, evacuation of passengers is not a problem.
We started training. It turned out to be not so simple. We started long hours of simulator exercises. We calculated optimal speeds, turn rates, radiuses…
In one year we learned to land within three minutes.
The Falkov disaster shook us all. For me it became a turning point: it turned out that I, a forty-year old captain, was unprepared. Until that crash we all thought that we would somehow do without, since the aircraft was very reliable…
There are no unsinkable Titanics.
No one would have survived in Falkov’s place. No one was psychologically ready. Now we know and we are always prepared… still, God save us from such thing.
Is it scary to fly?
No. It is scary to die helpless. Falkov’s last command was, “Gear up! Takeoff power!” He struggled until the end.
Do all captains make necessary conclusions after such disasters?
Nine years had passed. A Tu-154 was preparing for takeoff in Irkutsk, in the daytime, in winter. A problem occurred during startup of one of the engines, but in the end everything was fine, the engine started after repeated attempts.
Before takeoff the “Starter Dangerous RPM” lamp lit up on the flight engineer panel. This lamp signals that the starter did not disconnect from the engine and is going awry. A debate followed, after which the old and very experienced captain decided to take off anyway. For reasons unknown, he ignored the danger signal and took off. Within minutes the starter was blown apart and the engine started to burn.
The situation was exactly like the one Falkov faced, engine fire on the downwind leg at 2100 meters altitude. The runway is just below you, on your right. Extend the landing gear, descend quickly abeam the middle marker, slap down the flaps, turn around and there you are, safe on the runway. You do remember the crash at Krasnoyarsk, don’t you? You have spent countless night sleepless, analyzing the situation and coming to some sort of conclusions, haven’t you?
The old and experienced captain turned to his flight engineer and started asking questions. “What’s wrong? Really? Are you sure? All right, extinguish the fire.” And the plane was climbing away from the runway…
The precious time, a matter of minutes, was lost. Then, they finally came to their senses and started to turn around towards the airport. They descended to 900 meters in the turn. As they started gear extension, the hydraulics started to fail. The gear was just unlocking as the first officer reported, “Guys, it’s out of control.”
Five minutes had passed when the flight engineer managed to extinguish the fire.
The aircraft was descending slowly with two operational engines. She was flying like a model airplane, wavering slightly, but stable, with a two degree angle of descent and a vertical speed of three meters per second, just as it would on a perfect final approach. Except the speed was about 500 kilometers an hour…
The flight crew just sat there, awaiting death. No attempt was made to set takeoff power to the remaining engines and stop the descent, no attempt to use the stabilizer to reduce speed to normal and then maybe try to make it to the ice-laden Lake Baikal. No, they just sat there and did nothing.
The aircraft was descending towards a swamp. There was a farm just before the bog. What were they praying for? Were they praying to at least pass the farm? They didn’t. They hit it straight on the roof.
No one survives such a crash, at the speed of 500. The dead were gathered piece by piece, all one hundred seventy five people.
A man is weak. We are all prone to mistakes, even the most respected leaders. Captains are no exception, and in they make mistakes in full view of the crew. How do we preserve our authority, our prestige?
There is just no way to do it. Even a mistake must be used to improve the way we fly. Just yesterday I didn’t take into consideration several weather factors while landing in Norilsk and slammed the heavy aircraft on the runway, slightly short of the landing mark. It was a passing grade landing, of course, but… the captain is his own strict judge and the crew grunted under their breath...
I analyzed my mistake with the crew during debrief. I told them to learn how not to do it and promised that I wouldn’t do it again.
I don’t think my captain authority suffered any. Actually, it’s not all that important to me. The important thing is for the first officer to learn from my mistake and never to repeat it.
There are different crews and different captains. I share my experience and my opinions, which someone may very well disapprove of.
Children in a good family are brought up by the general order of things, such as the relationship between the parents, values and attitude to work. This I believe is the way a crew is formed, by the example of the captain. In any case, the captain, the commander of the crew, must be a decent person."

_________________
Red white and the pabst blue ribbon
Dead right that's how I'm livin'
Givin you more then the frauds and fakes
They can't make the kind of music I make, haha
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СообщениеДобавлено: Ср Окт 04, 2006 14:31 Ответить с цитатой
mikealpha
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In my opinion, that's one of the best books regarding professional aviation, that has ever been written . Every pilot or simmer, no matter from which part of the world, should read it.

So, it be great if it would be available as an english book.

_________________
С уважением - Viele Gruesse - Best regards

Michael
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СообщениеДобавлено: Ср Окт 04, 2006 14:43 Ответить с цитатой
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Oh, it definitely will be available. The author has authorized me to translate it, but I am currently exploring the possibilities of actually publishing it in the West. Ok, it may never become a #1 bestseller, but still, it's well worth a try.
I feel good simply translating it, so I will carry on regardless. Now I see some interest from the English-speaking community and it motivates me to finish the job and to do it well. Thanks for your support, MA.

_________________
Red white and the pabst blue ribbon
Dead right that's how I'm livin'
Givin you more then the frauds and fakes
They can't make the kind of music I make, haha
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СообщениеДобавлено: Ср Фев 28, 2007 16:17 Ответить с цитатой
Ap0pHiS
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Hello!

What a good idea!

Did your work progress?


Thanks you!

_________________
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СообщениеДобавлено: Ср Фев 28, 2007 18:39 Ответить с цитатой
citywalker
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This sounds like something anyone with flying on their mind must read. I'd definetly buy a copy.

_________________
regards, arno
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СообщениеДобавлено: Ср Фев 28, 2007 21:50 Ответить с цитатой
Fabo
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Переводчик

Anton, either translate it... or teach us all Russian enough to read and actually understand it.

From what I have readen just now, this is a must. Should be an obligatory reading for every pilot-student.

And a question, am I permitted to post this section on another web?

_________________
"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."

Peter Fabian
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СообщениеДобавлено: Чт Мар 01, 2007 22:34 Ответить с цитатой
erik011
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For sure I´ll buy it! It seems very promising - hope you´ll finish the translation soon and find a good publisher Хорошо
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СообщениеДобавлено: Вт Май 29, 2007 23:55 Ответить с цитатой
Ap0pHiS
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No news? Ммм...

_________________
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СообщениеДобавлено: Вт Июл 03, 2007 13:36 Ответить с цитатой
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Hi everyone,

I must apologize for the loooong silence. I suppose this apology also goes to Mr. Yershov, with whom I had been in correspondence for awhile. I was... delayed in my work by external circumstances. Which means that, unfortunately, not much progress has been made so far.

However, I am resuming the translation work after this long period of inactivity (or rather other activity). I promise to regularily update this thread with news on the status of my work.

I appreciate your interest.

Best regards,
Anton.

_________________
Red white and the pabst blue ribbon
Dead right that's how I'm livin'
Givin you more then the frauds and fakes
They can't make the kind of music I make, haha
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СообщениеДобавлено: Вт Июл 03, 2007 14:22 Ответить с цитатой
Ap0pHiS
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Oh, great news! Nice to see we'll have this book one day! (I thought you abandoned the idea)

Thank you!

_________________
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СообщениеДобавлено: Вт Июл 03, 2007 17:55 Ответить с цитатой
Fabo
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That is good news indeed! Though I am in rather good progress of reading in Russian, it would be nice addition and I could understand some portions I did not in original...

Thank you.

_________________
"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."

Peter Fabian
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СообщениеДобавлено: Вт Июл 10, 2007 09:29 Ответить с цитатой
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Chapter 2 is finished now. A brief sample of that:
Цитата:

In 1980 I became part of the crew of the Captain Vyacheslav Vasilievich Solodun. I started to learn from him, and noticed envious glances from my colleagues. Only later did I understand what they were envious of.
I was lucky to fly with him. Everything that I am good at as a pilot, was taught to me by Solodun. All of my life principles and mores are those of Solodun’s. All the kindness and respect that I treat my students with comes from Solodun.
Solodun taught me to fly. It was the highest piloting education I could get. Without a doubt, that, which we call the Krasnoyarsk school, is Solodun’s school.
His teaching method was as simple as it was brilliant. We were just about equal in theoretic disciplines. When it came to flying skills, the Captain used to say, “Watch how this is done.” Then he would show exactly how. “Do you understand? No? Watch again. Understand now? No? All right, let’s do it again. Understand? Thank God. Now you do it.”
Such was the way to mastery.
The true professional can demonstrate his skill. An unprofessional will give you a long and inspiring lecture, but will not demonstrate his skill.
We have often discussed the finer points of the art of flying with Solodun. We tested our suppositions in real flights, we learned to flight with zero tolerances, we strived to fly absolutely flawlessly, on the edge, to achieve full mastery of our instrument, to make the best of our aircraft.
Those skills came in handy more than once.
Later I was transferred to Vladimir Andreyevich Repin. His flight techniques were refined to such a degree, that I, even after the school of Solodun, was very enthusiastic about his methods. Repin taught me all he knew and he wanted to be the pilot who would make me a Captain, but it so happened that I got my Captaincy from Solodun.
Having trained with these outstanding pilots, I realized that there is no limit to perfection of airmanship, providing that one is always eager to work on himself.
Those were the two brightest representatives of the Krasnoyarsk school. They were very different personalities, but they had something in common: their passionate love for flying, perfectly refined airmanship, precision and a burning desire to give it all to the student they deemed worthy.
Worthy or not, but I realized that the school must go on. I completed the instructor course at the first chance I got and was admitted to instructor work. Since then, all my flights were training for the co-pilots.
I wouldn’t say that I am especially gifted as a pilot. Throughout my flying experiences I often saw that something or other was difficult for me: I have a slow reaction and I have to think ahead to avoid having to react later. During my instrument flight training I sometimes muttered to myself, “horizon – speed – horizon – vertical velocity – horizon – course – altitude”… This way I learned to scan the instruments, and later the skill of seeing all instruments in one glance came very naturally to me.
After all, this piloting skill, all those speeds, courses, power settings, percents, distances, bank angles and radiuses are only a means to an end, a way of reaching the objective. There is more than one way of reaching it, though. The methods are aplenty.
But the school of Solodun teaches that everything should be done beautifully. Repin’s school teaches how to do it on the edge. To spark the flame within that kid in the right seat.
I do not know if I have surpassed my teachers. It is not so important, although one has to strive to do that. The important thing is to keep the school going.
Still this is not a school for the school in itself. This is not a flying club. We have tremendous experience of regular commercial flights in any conditions. We carry passengers behind our backs and we want them to enjoy the flights, not to fear them. And this is no secret that every flight with the passengers is a training flight. Which means that the new generation of pilots, soon to take the left seat, will be able to fly like we do, or better.
The passenger usually evaluates our professionalism as a skill to make a soft landing, especially in turbulent or windy conditions. Naturally, landing is more challenging in difficult conditions. But I know from my own experience that it is harder to land softly under ideal circumstances. Something is missing, some incentive, some stimulus.
Imagine sitting somewhere in front with the wheels thirty meters behind you. You will have to feel the concrete with those wheels, at the speed of 250 kilometers per hour.
I assure you, it is possible to land extremely softly. There are people who can do it.
Rumor has it that once there was a great craftsman, a smith, who could close a matchbox with a steam hammer. Another one could pick up an egg with a grab crane. Or a bulldozer operator, who once leveled ground for a stadium with two inch deviation with no other instrument than the good old eyeball mark one.
We had a great master in our crew for eight years. Alexey Dmitrievich Babayev could land the eighty ton aircraft so softly that we could not discern whether we are still in the air or already rolling. It was like a tender touch of lovers’ lips. He did it with twelve heavy wheels.
I tried to learn this skill from my co-pilot. But it was beyond me. However, I try to instill the notion of “Babayev landing” in my students.
“Normal landing” is still a common concept within the pilot community. A pilot can slam the aircraft on the runway and call it a “normal, operational landing”. There are allowances and tolerances, designed by our superiors and written in our manuals with the less capable of us in mind. According to those rules, Babayev’s landing should have been graded as 8 on a five-point scale. I also try, but I don’t always succeed.
There should be no “normal, operational landings”. Such a landing is an embarrassment in my crew, although considered top grade in the manuals.
One of my teachers, a gifted pilot and also a high level supervisor, Rauf Nurgatovich Sadykov, to my complains that the aircraft is complex and difficult, and that flying it resembles trying to repair an electric socket under power, replied with a degree of disappointment in his voice, “What are you talking about? You have to love the machine…”
There is no “operational landings”. The aircraft must be loved. Babayev did love it. The Great Master of Soft Landings.


Might be some misspellings and so forth in the text, however, this hasn't really been proofread yet.

_________________
Red white and the pabst blue ribbon
Dead right that's how I'm livin'
Givin you more then the frauds and fakes
They can't make the kind of music I make, haha
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СообщениеДобавлено: Вт Июл 10, 2007 10:28 Ответить с цитатой
Ap0pHiS
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Héhe, I can't wait the whole book now! Great Perevodchik, it is simply great! Good work!

_________________
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СообщениеДобавлено: Вт Июл 10, 2007 11:26 Ответить с цитатой
Fabo
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I can say nothing but agree with Ap0pHiS. This book is a gem.

_________________
"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."

Peter Fabian
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СообщениеДобавлено: Чт Июл 12, 2007 12:12 Ответить с цитатой
Переводчик
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Ap0pHiS писал(а):
Héhe, I can't wait the whole book now! Great Perevodchik, it is simply great! Good work!


Thanks, but the credit goes exclusively to the author Улыбка
Been a bit busy the last couple of days, no progress right now. I'll get to Chapter three next week hopefully.

_________________
Red white and the pabst blue ribbon
Dead right that's how I'm livin'
Givin you more then the frauds and fakes
They can't make the kind of music I make, haha
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Translation of Yershov book
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